Christina Campbell, Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education

No one said it was going to easy - especially in a state bigger than Texas, California, and Montana combined.  But facing big challenges is something Joie Millett is ready to face head-on. Millett is the new Program Manager of the Alaska College & Career Advising Corps (ACAC). Having grown up in rural Alaska, Millett is familiar with the difficulties students wishing to pursue college and career training face.

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Jocelyn De Jong, University of Washington, Seattle WA

Beginning with autumn 2018 applicants, the University of Washington (Seattle) admission application deadline will move to November 15. The decision to move to an earlier deadline was made with fervent discussion and consideration of how it may affect applicants and you, our colleagues who advise them. Ultimately, moving up the deadline allows us to notify applicants of their admission decisions earlier, and we felt this was, overall, a better outcome for the student. Also beginning with autumn 2018, our notification period will shift to March 1-15. With the Coalition Application opening in July and the UW specific questions opening September 1, the application will, in effect, be open two weeks longer than in previous cycles.

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Dear PNACAC Members,

During this time of uncertainty the Pacific Northwest Association for College Admission Counseling (PNACAC) is joining many organizations in denouncing President Trump’s Immigration Executive Order from Friday, January 27, 2017. This Executive Order bans “entry of all refugees to the United States for 120 days, [barring] Syrian refugees indefinitely, and [blocking] entry into the United States for 90 days for citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.” PNACAC stands by our members and the students and families they serve regardless of age, gender, sex, race, color, country of origin, ethnicity, culture, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, immigration status, or disability.

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By Mike Sass, Gonzaga University
 

In the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, discussions have erupted about what is to come next.  From newly proposed legislation to the selection of a Supreme Court Justice, no one knows what exactly is in store for the U.S. and the American education system, but among the topics of conversation is immigration reform.  President-elect Donald Trump campaigned on a promise to immediately reverse the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program - better known as DACA - if elected. Since DACA was first implemented by President Barack Obama through an executive order, the President-elect will hold the power to completely overturn the policy and shutter the program after taking the oath of office.  DACA and its potential reversal could affect many students at all levels.

Many believe that an immediate shutdown of the program is not likely, but ambiguity surrounds what will actually happen on January 20, 2017.  While advocates representing both sides of the issue are lobbying lawmakers (and the incoming administration), Congressional Representatives on both sides of the aisle, and several prominent non-governmental organizations are advocating for a slower elimination of DACA if the President-elect is to jettison the program.  Republican Senators Lindsay Graham (R-SC) and Jeff Flake (R-AZ) have joined together with Dick Durban (D-IL), one of the creators of the DACA program, to craft legislation helping to provide legal support and protection to individuals who are current beneficiaries of DACA.

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